INSTRUMENT P&ID SYMBOLS FILETYPE PDF

Valve Symbols Valves are used to control the direction, flow rate, and pressure of fluids. Figure 1 shows the symbols that depict the major valve types. It should be noted that globe and gate valves will often be depicted by the same valve symbol. In such cases, information concerning the valve type may be conveyed by the component identification number or by the notes and legend section of the drawing; however, in many instances even that may not hold true.

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Valve Symbols Valves are used to control the direction, flow rate, and pressure of fluids. Figure 1 shows the symbols that depict the major valve types. It should be noted that globe and gate valves will often be depicted by the same valve symbol. In such cases, information concerning the valve type may be conveyed by the component identification number or by the notes and legend section of the drawing; however, in many instances even that may not hold true.

Figure 1 : Valve Symbols Valve Actuators Some valves are provided with actuators to allow remote operation, to increase mechanical advantage, or both. Figure 2 shows the symbols for the common valve actuators. Note that although each is shown attached to a gate valve, an actuator can be attached to any type of valve body.

If no actuator is shown on a valve symbol, it may be assumed the valve is equipped only with a hand-wheel for manual operation. Figure 2 : Valve Actuator Symbols The combination of a valve and an actuator is commonly called a control valve.

Control valves are symbolized by combining the appropriate valve symbol and actuator symbol, as illustrated in Figure 2. Control valves can be configured in many different ways. The most commonly found configurations are to manually control the actuator from a remote operating station, to automatically control the actuator from an instrument, or both. In many cases, remote control of a valve is accomplished by using an intermediate, small control valve to operate the actuator of the process control valve.

The intermediate control valve is placed in the line supplying motive force to the process control valve, as shown in Figure 3. In this example, air to the process air-operated control valve is controlled by the solenoid-operated, 3-way valve in the air supply line.

Figure 3 : Remotely Controlled Valve Note that the symbols alone in Figure 3 do not provide the reader with enough information to determine whether applying air pressure to the diaphragm opens or closes the process control valve, or whether energizing the solenoid pressurizes or vents the diaphragm. Further, Figure 3 is incomplete in that it does not show the electrical portion of the valve control system nor does it identify the source of the motive force compressed air.

Although Figure 3 informs the reader of the types of mechanical components in the control system and how they interconnect, it does not provide enough information to determine how those components react to a control signal.

Control valves operated by an instrument signal are symbolized in the same manner as those shown previously, except the output of the controlling instrument goes to the valve actuator. Again, note that Figure 4 does not contain enough information to enable the reader to determine how the control valve responds to a change in level. Figure 4 : Level Control Valve An additional aspect of some control valves is a valve positioner, which allows more precise control of the valve. This is especially useful when instrument signals are used to control the valve.

An example of a valve positioner is a set of limit switches operated by the motion of the valve. A positioner is symbolized by a square box on the stem of the control valve actuator. The positioner may have lines attached for motive force, instrument signals, or both. Figure 5 shows two examples of valves equipped with positioners.

Note that, although these examples are more detailed than those of Figure 3 and Figure 4, the reader still does not have sufficient information to fully determine response of the control valve to a change in control signal. Figure 5 : Control Valves with Valve Positioners In Example A of Figure 5, the reader can reasonably assume that opening of the control valve is in some way proportional to the level it controls and that the solenoid valve provides an override of the automatic control signals.

However, the reader cannot ascertain whether it opens or closes the control valve. Also, the reader cannot determine in which direction the valve moves in response to a change in the control parameter. In Example B of Figure 5, the reader can make the same general assumptions as in Example A, except the control signal is unknown. Without additional information, the reader can only assume the air supply provides both the control signal and motive force for positioning the control valve.

Even when valves are equipped with positioners, the positioner symbol may appear only on detailed system diagrams. Larger, overall system diagrams usually do not show this much detail and may only show the examples of Figure 5 as air-operated valves with no special features. Control Valve Designations A control valve may serve any number of functions within a fluid system. To differentiate between valve uses, a balloon labeling system is used to identify the function of a control valve, as shown in Figure 6.

For example:.

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Piping and Instrumentation Diagram – P&ID

The shapes in this legend are representative of the functional relationship between piping, instrumentation, and system equipment units. This group includes hardware like compressors, conveyors, motors, turbines, vacuums, and other mechanical devices. Piping symbols A pipe is a tube that transports fluid substances. Piping can be made of various materials, including metal and plastic. The piping group is made up of one-to-many pipes, multi-line pipes, separators, and other types of piping devices. Vessel symbols A vessel is a container that is used to store fluid.

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Piping and Instrumentation Drawing (P&ID) Tutorials – Part 3

JoJozragore Remember to click save after changing the columns and reports before clicking apply or ok. Orthographic Folder This folder is the location where you want orthographics that you will issue. This dialog is extremely similar to the Assign Tag Format dialog, and lets you set up the Attribute Definition to display properties of the target entity, properties of the Drawing, or properties of the Project. If the answer to these two questions is yes, do not create a new class. Make sure to note that the first field is the Display Name which may include spaces. Managing these palettes can be done through standard AutoCAD techniques.

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